R. Shawn McBride Live

Posts for for December, 2016

Making Effective Plans: What if Gaming

Posted on: December 30th, 2016 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

One of the things we like to do with our clients when we’re working with them on business plans and moving them to their eventual success is do what we call ‘what if gaming’. It’s not very complicated, but it can lead to tremendous effects on the business. Most people build business plans based on a linear fashion. They make certain assumptions. They want to get from point A to point B, and they execute a business plan that says, “We’re going to go from A to B.”

Now, how many of us have been able to go from exactly A to exactly B as planned. This is incredibly complex. Just think about your morning commute. If your morning commute is of any distance, there are variations every day. One day a school bus is going to be running a little bit earlier and stop on the way. The traffic light might be green or red depending on your timing. There’ll be other motorists that will come at unpredictable times. Highway traffic may vary up or down. The point is, even the simplest plan to get from your house to your office can have great variations. How do people believe that a business which has tremendous number of third party inputs, requirements, and needs from others, could be as simple as saying, “We’re going to go from A to B, and this is exactly how we’re going to go?” It’s not realistic.

What do we do with our clients? We talk a lot about ‘what if’ planning. This adds a ton of strength to their plans. What if this assumption doesn’t happen? What if that assumption doesn’t happen? What if a third assumption doesn’t happen? What happens if multiple assumptions don’t happen simultaneously? We can start running through these plans and a couple of things happen.

#1 The company becomes more attractive to investors. Investors that know that you’ve been through the ‘what if’ planning are more likely to invest in you.

#2 The management team becomes more confident. They know that even if twists and turns come to them, they’re going to make it. It becomes less stressful if there’s changes to the business plan.

#3 The business becomes stronger. Often there’s opportunities. If something doesn’t happen exactly as planned, that often means that the market’s not reacting exactly the way we thought it would, but it might mean there’s another opportunity out there, that we can take advantage of and move towards. We want to run through a lot of ‘what if’ planning and really think about how we’re going to move forward, even if what we’re not expecting doesn’t happen.

How have you used planning in your business? Have you run through ‘what ifs’? Have you thought about the different possibilities of what might happen in your business? How has planning benefited you? Write in the comment below. We’d love to hear from you and get a discussion started about the pluses and minuses of ‘what if’ planning.

 

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business:  www.mcbrideforbusiness.com/BlogGift

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances.  This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity.

 

About the Author

Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment (www.yourbusinessspeaker.com), gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can reach R. Shawn McBride at info@mcbrideforbusiness.com or (214) 418-0258.

Check us out on the web at www.mcbrideforbusiness.com , www.yourbusinessspeaker.com

Get Shawn’s latest book: www.mcbridebook.com

Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #mcbrideforbusiness #3lawsofempowerment

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mcbrideforbusiness/?fref=ts

 

Is Your Business Your Family? Key Differences Between Home and Work

Posted on: December 29th, 2016 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

It’s become a popular phrase these days to say, “Our company is a family,” “We work together as a family,” or the famous “My employees are like family.” We hear these kinds of statements, and we find that it’s a very dangerous idea. Family and business are really different. Family is an unconditional love, it is not conditioned on any actions or things being accomplished. You love a family member because they are part of your family and they’re part of your existence. You will take them as they are.

Business is different. Businesses is based on goals, and objectives, and outcomes, and you need to be very focused on getting to those goals and objectives. It’s not about everybody doing exactly what they want to do, how they want to do it, the way they want to do it. It has to be part of a broader process.

Your team at work (team is a great analogy), is a great way to think about business and how your business is organized – everybody’s coming together to work for a collective whole. Just like a baseball team or a football team, you’re all in it together. You’re going to work through injuries. You’re going to work through bad plays together. You’re going to cover for each other, and you’re going to keep moving forward even if everything doesn’t go perfect.

To be on the team, to earn the spot on the team, you need to be of sufficient quality. You need to be a contributing member of the team. If you can’t make sufficient contributions, the team needs to be changed. The whole stays the same, but the individual parts may have to be changed out. I think this is a very good analogy for the business. We want to encourage our team members. We want our team members to grow, we even want our team members to change over time, grow, become more valuable contributors, and move on to more senior and more responsibility roles. We, as an organization, have a responsibility for that but they need to be contributing member of the team. They’re not family. We don’t give unconditional love in business. We can’t tolerate somebody who wants to do things that harm our customers, that go against our business objectives, or don’t fit our business model. We need to think carefully about the difference between family, and team, and business.

 

What’s been your experience with building teams? Have you thought about team members as family? Has this ever led to a problem? What do you think about the analogy of team versus family in your business? We’d love to hear from you in the comments below.

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business:  www.mcbrideforbusiness.com/BlogGift

 

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances.  This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer Ne3/4a Eerin.

About the Author

Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment (www.yourbusinessspeaker.com) , gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can reach R. Shawn McBride at info@mcbrideforbusiness.com or (214) 418-0258.

Check us out on the web at www.mcbrideforbusiness.com , www.yourbusinessspeaker.com

Get Shawn’s latest book: www.mcbridebook.com

Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #mcbrideforbusiness #3lawsofempowerment

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mcbrideforbusiness/?fref=ts

Building More Effective Work Teams: Three Key Things to Incorporate

Posted on: December 28th, 2016 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

At McBride For Business, LLC and The R. Shawn McBride Law Firm, PLLC, we are growing businesses. We are not only working with other people to help their growth, but we are dealing with our own internal growth. We’ve been an expanding organization for some time, and we’ve had to deal with the realities of keeping our teams coordinated and having a consistent culture. We’ve also worked with our other clients in this area. What we’ve come up with is a few fundamental things that we think are key to teams working together to allowing growth, and allowing the business to go to the next level. What are some key things?

#1 Communication. We need to have the team communicating. We need to make sure everybody’s on the same page and rowing in the same direction. In our business, we use email, telephone calls, and group team calls where we talk about what everybody’s doing and how the coordinated whole works together. Everybody needs to know what everybody’s doing. Everybody sitting in the dark, or working separately going in a different direction, is going to lead to unexpected outcomes. People are going to be doing things that they didn’t know that others were doing, doing duplicate work. Then more importantly, there will also be holes. There will be things that will be completely missed.

#2 Cooperation and collaboration. We make sure our teams are working together as a whole. We make sure that everybody is on the same team and that our efforts are coordinated. One person will be working on one aspect of a project and another person will be working on another aspect of the same project. When brought together, we create a sum that’s greater than the parts.

#3 Another thing that we work on is compromise. Some projects will be very popular. A lot of the team members will want to work on them. Other projects will be not nearly as popular, so will not want to spend as much time on those. The work still needs to be done. The output needs to be done for the clients or for the business. What do we do? We communicate, as we discussed before, and then we make sure we compromise. We make sure that somebody’s picking up the ball, and that somehow it’s getting accomplished.

These three Cs are key to keeping our teams coordinated, and keeping us moving forward in a path of growth. Interestingly, these three Cs that are key to success in our business are also success items that we find women in business partnerships take advantage of. You can see more discussion of those advantages and these three Cs in Shawn’s prior blogs and Shawns’s TED Talk from Topeka, Kansas, for the TEDx Topeka Women Event (2016).

 

What’s been your experience with cooperation and communication? How have you worked together with others? How have you kept things moving forward? I’d love to hear your thoughts and ideas in the comments below.

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business:  www.mcbrideforbusiness.com/BlogGift

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances.  This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer Michal Koralewski.

 

About the Author

Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment (www.yourbusinessspeaker.com), gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can reach R. Shawn McBride at info@mcbrideforbusiness.com or (214) 418-0258.

Check us out on the web at www.mcbrideforbusiness.com , www.yourbusinessspeaker.com

Get Shawn’s latest book: www.mcbridebook.com

Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #mcbrideforbusiness #3lawsofempowerment

Riding The Entrepreneurial Wave

Posted on: December 27th, 2016 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

In our prior blogs, we’ve talked about the ups and downs of riding the wave – the wave of business. We’ve talked about the fact that entrepreneurs often want to do different things at different times. Part of this is there are going to be waves. There are going to be times where your business is going to feel like it’s moving very, very, quickly. Everything is changing, things are evolving, things are happening. Then there’s going to be times when you feel like things are waiting. I can’t explain why there are ups and downs. All I can do is tell you that they’re normal.

After talking to a number of entrepreneurs, I can tell you there’s certainly these periods of ups and downs. People take time to react, particularly if you’re moving up in the market. If you’re being successful, you’re probably getting involved in new and different things as your business grows and as your capabilities increase. Your customers are probably growing and changing. It takes awhile. It’s a stair step. Often you’ll do certain things to raise to another level, and it will take the market awhile to react and to determine that, yes, you have accomplished getting to that next level. Once people see that you’re at that level, then you’ll gain new customers, new footholds, and things will quickly speed up again.

You, as the entrepreneur, need to know that there is a roller coaster, and that you’re going to be riding it. Not every day is going to be up. Not every day is going to be down. There is often a correlation. Sometimes you’ll have a long period of flat days. You’ll have a period of declining days. You’ll have a period of increasing days. When everything is increasing, you can love riding that wave. Of course, with experience, you’ll know the wave will come to an end at some point. On the reverse side, when you’re on a down wave, you need to have the experience and the intestinal fortitude to know the down wave is going to end also.

Entrepreneurship is a journey. It is going to have ups and downs. You just need to stick to your path. Keep moving towards the future, and understand that you can get there.

What’s been your experience with the entrepreneurial roller coaster? What have been some of your hardest times to get through? What have been your moments of great breakthroughs? Share it in the comments below. Let’s discuss and learn from one another.

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business:  www.mcbrideforbusiness.com/BlogGift

 

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances.  This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer Marsy.

About the Author

Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment (www.yourbusinessspeaker.com), gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can reach R. Shawn McBride at info@mcbrideforbusiness.com or (214) 418-0258.

Check us out on the web at www.mcbrideforbusiness.com , www.yourbusinessspeaker.com

Get Shawn’s latest book: www.mcbridebook.com

Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #mcbrideforbusiness #3lawsofempowerment

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mcbrideforbusiness/?fref=ts

I Get Bored – Am I Going Out of Business?

Posted on: December 26th, 2016 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

It’s in the inherent nature of entrepreneurs to want to be challenged, to want to be invigorated, and want to try new things. Entrepreneurs constantly want you pushing the limit. One feedback we get from many entrepreneurs is that at some point in the business lives, they get bored. They feel the need to do something new. We’ve talked a lot in earlier blogs about economic specialization, focus, and creating something of extreme value. The entrepreneur’s time should be used to increase the most value, and delegating and using a team to provide other services and activities which aren’t in the very core of what an entrepreneur does best and for the most value added. This is yet another instance.

What we see with many entrepreneurs as they’re progressing and running their business, they want to be working on the plan. They want to be working on development. They want to be building the growth to what the future is, but they often don’t enjoy the repetitive tasks. The great business guru in Dallas, Lin O’Neill (http://www.futures-consulting.com/about/, once told me that entrepreneurs only want to do things once, and then they want to move on to something else. I think this is very true. How do you build your organizations around this? The key is to make sure everybody is rowing in the same direction, and the entrepreneur’s being used for unique, new, things.

There truly are different skill sets in the world. Some people enjoy the routine. They like having a method. They like coming in and doing the same thing over and over and over, again. Whereas other people like to be challenged and have different things, and have things change. What we need as a matter of a team is to blend these two. We want some team members who want to repeat a process and do it over, and over, and over, again. We want other team members who are constantly evolving, and breaking into new ground, and trying new things. The beauty is, when you blend these two together, you get an organization which supports its routine functions, but then also can grow and do new things. It’s the blending that’s key. This is yet another instance where economic specialization and focus can come in and bring your organization to a higher and higher level.

 

What are you seeing? What have you seen in your organizations? How have you specialized? How have you used the team to allow you to do greater and better things? How does your company’s personality reflect your personality? Drop us a note in the comments below, and let’s discuss.

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business:  www.mcbrideforbusiness.com/BlogGift

 

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances.  This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer Slavomir Ulicny.

About the Author

Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment (www.yourbusinessspeaker.com) , gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can reach R. Shawn McBride at info@mcbrideforbusiness.com or (214) 418-0258.

Check us out on the web at www.mcbrideforbusiness.com , www.yourbusinessspeaker.com

Get Shawn’s latest book: www.mcbridebook.com

Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #mcbrideforbusiness #3lawsofempowerment

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mcbrideforbusiness/?fref=ts

 

Achieve More by Building a Plan

Posted on: December 23rd, 2016 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

How do you get to an end that you really want to get to? What do you do to make sure things happen?

When I speak, I often speak about The 3 Laws of Empowerment, building processes that empower the person making the decision. Often business owners, sometimes executives, and sometimes people just journeying through their career, rely on the principles of The 3 Laws of Empowerment to figure out how to get where they’re going. First you need to prepare, then you need to plan, and then you need to make sure you’re protected. The 3 Laws work beautifully in conjunction with each other.

A lot of people struggle with the planning and the preparation, and really choosing for themselves and knowing that they can get to an end result that they want to get to. How do we make that happen? How do we build an end result that is worthy of building a plan to get to?

The plan is really a bridge, and the protections about getting to where you want to go, and making sure you get what’s fair and right, that you get what’s earned. How do you set that milestone in the future?

The first step, as some people would say, is to dream big. Think about what you want. Think about what your goals are. Think about how you want to get to the next level. What do you want your life to look like? What do you want your personal and professional mix to look like? What mixture of ingredients will support the life that you want, not the life that somebody else wants, but a life that you want, in a way that you want to live it?

We want to be bold, but we also want to be realistic. If you want a future that involves flying cars, you’re going to have to rely on somebody else to develop those and make that technology happen (unless you are scientist inventing flying cars). If you have certain other goals, family goals, career goals, the goal of impacting others – the goals of making lives better in whichever way you define it – these goals are very realistic.

You don’t have to limit yourself by looking at those around you, looking at your family’s history, or your history, and say, “that is my upper limit.” Take the top off the limit. Know that you can achieve more, and then start building a plan to get there. What skills do you need? What help do you need? What totality of circumstances will allow you to be there? What does your future look like, and how do you build to achieve it?

If you can build a detailed picture of what you want, and the person you have to be in order to accomplish that, and how your life will look, then you can start to work backwards. I think the first big step in making a plan like this realistic is to really dream, and really think about it, and spend a lot of time in that dream working out the details. How does everything work together? How do the details play together? Then start working backwards.

What has your experience been in building a plan? Let us know in the comment section. We love to hear from you.

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business:  www.mcbrideforbusiness.com/BlogGift

 

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances.  This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer Raquel Sanchez Nieto.

 

About the Author

Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment (www.yourbusinessspeaker.com) , gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can reach R. Shawn McBride at info@mcbrideforbusiness.com or (214) 418-0258.

Check us out on the web at www.mcbrideforbusiness.com , www.yourbusinessspeaker.com

Get Shawn’s latest book: www.mcbridebook.com

Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #mcbrideforbusiness #3lawsofempowerment

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mcbrideforbusiness/?fref=ts

Keeping Your Company Moving Forward: One Simple Strategy

Posted on: December 22nd, 2016 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

At McBride for Business (www.mcbrideforbusiness.com) we are big fans of simplicity. We think simplicity is a key to understanding and moving the business forward. Complexity can cost so much. When we hear of simple strategies or simple ways for businesses to succeed we get very excited. There’s been some interesting academic research in parallel areas to business (which has been underreported in the business press, so it is often forgotten), yet can be so valuable to making a business work.

We talk a lot about organizational theories and making businesses that work. Part of making businesses that work is having teams that are bound together.

One thing that binds people together is stories. Academic research has shown that families that engage in storytelling with one another, that have a family theme about how they do things in a family way (which is portrayed in stories and tales of the past), actually are more cohesive families. They’re able to accomplish more. They have less disruption and a better outcome for their children. Now, we’ve talked about the fact that business and family are different (http://www.mcbrideforbusiness.com/blog/family-dynamics-whats-good-for-the-goose-is-good-for-the-gander/) But it doesn’t mean that we can’t learn business themes from family. Importing storytelling into your business can also create cohesive energy, and it can cause the business to have a common theme and purpose.

We work so hard on culture, and it’s one of the hardest things to transfer. It’s why mergers fail. It’s why companies lose their direction, and it’s why businesses often go out of business at the end of the day. But we can have strategies to keep the company aligned, to keep everybody working together. One of those key strategies is storytelling.

You may want to have everybody in the company share stories about who they are, what they want to be, and what the company is. Share legends of great customer service, so that others can model it. Talk about how the business works. Talk about the great time when you saved a customer and how that showed your company’s value and customer service ethic. This creates a way of transferring knowledge in a very safe way, and also a very practical way. This very simple strategy can connect everyone in a more meaningful way.

One of the lessons of my speaking career (www.yourbusinessspeaker.com) is that people connect to stories, and your employees will too. When they hear the stories, they’ll feel connected. This will be much more effective than a bunch of mission statements, and other documents, which nobody really reads, or nobody fully understands. A story can be transferred. Mankind has been using stories over the generations to transfer knowledge. They’re understandable. They’re relatable, and now you can bring this powerful tool into your company by creating stories of who you are, and what your company is so that you can transfer this knowledge to your employees.

Have you experimented with storytelling in the past? What has been your experience? How have your employees reacted? Is this a tool you’re going to try in the future? Let us know in the comments below.

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business:  www.mcbrideforbusiness.com/BlogGift

 

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances. Each case is unique.  Past results do not guarantee future outcomes. This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer Eduardo Siqueira Filho.

 

About the Author

Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment (www.yourbusinessspeaker.com/3laws), gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can reach R. Shawn McBride at info@mcbrideforbusiness.com or (214) 418-0258.

 

Check us out on the web at www.mcbrideforbusiness.com, www.yourbusinessspeaker.com/3laws

Get Shawn’s latest book: www.mcbridebook.com

Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #McbrideForBusiness #3LawsofEmpowerment

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mcbrideforbusiness/?fref=ts

 

 

 

Building A Systems That Work

Posted on: December 22nd, 2016 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

If we see one thing consistent among all successful companies and persons, it seems to be systems of some sort or process. Everybody’s business that has evolved to a bigger size has systems, repetitive actions and processes that are done over and over and over again.

Why is this important? Systems are important because they reinforce activity. We’ve talked in earlier blogs about process and procedure,  http://www.mcbrideforbusiness.com/blog/building-procedu…tematic-approach/ that systems are things that are done repeatedly, that are done over and over again.  They’re critically important because they require you to repeat an action on a regular basis. As you get better at something, you can do it again and again and again – more efficiently and profitably each time. It also keeps your focus. By having a system that you follow you’re going to do certain activities again and again.

What might be part of your system? You might want to make a certain number of phone calls to prospects every week. You might want to do a certain amount of reading. You might want to talk to a certain number of clients. You might want to do a certain amount of writing on your next book.

What you see here is a theme of repeated action that keeps you moving forward. This repetition keeps you from getting lost and forgetting about something.

We’re all very busy. If you’re running a growing business you’re going to be pulled in all kinds of directions. Your systems for yourself and your team keeps everybody focused on key activities so that the business moves forward. In fact, the mere idea of having a system forces you to prioritize. This helps you determine what you want to do more of, what you want to do less of and where you want to spend your time and energy — which maybe the most valuable part of the whole process.

What have you done in your business with systems and processes? What are you doing repeatedly? How are you making things better? Let us know about your experience and thoughts in the comments section below.

 

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business:  www.mcbrideforbusiness.com/BlogGift

 

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances.  Each case is unique.  Past results do not guarantee future outcomes. This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer Svilen Milev.

 

About the Author

Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment (www.yourbusinessspeaker.com ), gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can reach R. Shawn McBride at info@mcbrideforbusiness.com or (214) 418-0258.

 

Check us out on the web at www.mcbrideforbusiness.com , www.yourbusinessspeaker.com

Get Shawn’s latest book: www.mcbridebook.com

Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #McbrideForBusiness #3LawsofEmpowerment

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mcbrideforbusiness/?fref=ts

 

 

 

 

 

Culture: The Centerpiece of Your Business

Posted on: December 21st, 2016 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

I was recently on Marsha Zidel’s radio show, The Business Edge (http://www.smartmovescoach.com/business-edge/), and she asked me an interesting question about culture. It opened up some thinking and reflection on culture and why it’s so important. Culture is the life blood of your business. It’s what makes you, you. It’s what distinguishes you from others.

In marketing, we’re all looking for the unique. What is your unique selling proposition? What makes you different from everybody else? How do you deliver differently? Culture is at the center of this. Culture defines what you can do, who you can be, how you can market yourself or your business, and how you can get done what you get done. It defines who you are.

If you promise things that your culture doesn’t support, your business isn’t going to grow. You’re going to struggle. You’re going to have problems. But if your culture is consistent with your business, if the two are aligned, then you’re positioned for growth. Then you’re able to deliver what you should deliver. You’re able to satisfy your customers. It’s critical you think about your culture, about who you are, what your business is, and how it aligns with the promises you’re making to your customers.

What’s your business culture like? How is your business doing? How have you positioned yourself for growth? Have you made your culture consistent with who you are? Join us in the comments below.

Make sure you download our free checklist to assess your business:  www.mcbrideforbusiness.com/BlogGift

This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances.  This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. Freeimages.com/photographer astkam.

About the Author

Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment (www.yourbusinessspeaker.com) , gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can reach R. Shawn McBride at info@mcbrideforbusiness.com or (214) 418-0258.

 

Check us out on the web at www.mcbrideforbusiness.com , www.yourbusinessspeaker.com

Get Shawn’s latest book: www.mcbridebook.com

Add us on Twitter: @McBrideForBus #mcbrideforbusiness #3lawsofempowerment

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mcbrideforbusiness/?fref=ts

Contents of an LLC Agreement

Posted on: December 21st, 2016 by R. Shawn McBride No Comments

We talked before about the fact that you want a well written LLC agreement, even if you have a single owner company. You want to make sure your LLC agreement has certain key things in it. You want to make sure that it’s protecting you.

What have we seen? We’ve seen cases where people have fought over the ownership of the LLC. We’ve seen times where liability has not been kept, and we’ve seen people build LLC agreements that don’t give them the flexibility they need to run the business. There’s a couple of key things that you’re going to want to make sure are in your LLC agreement. An experienced attorney can help you make sure you have these correct provisions in your agreement.

#1 You want to make sure the ownership is clear. Even if you’re a single owner company, you would like to have a document that shows you’re a single owner, that you’ve placed in your file for evidentiary reasons. We’ve seen disputes where companies have not had an LLC agreement, and then later one person argues that they are indeed the owner of a company, and the other doesn’t have any materials to memorialize the fact that they are indeed the owner. In a case like that you want to make sure that you have that document in place. While it won’t be dispositive in the event of litigation — it typically won’t end the litigation — it will certainly be a good factor to show who is the owner of the company.

#2 You also want to make sure you have correct liability eliminating language. We’ve seen LLC agreements with unfortunate language in it that have increased owner liability, rather than decreased it. While it’s beyond the scope of this blog, there’s certain language you can put in the LLC agreement to minimize your risk of having liability from third parties on issues. You want to make sure your LLC agreement limits your administrative burdens. A lot of times people copy and paste, and use LLC agreements that require a lot of record keeping, meetings, and other issues. One of the reasons people love LLC’s is that they require less work, they’re simpler to administer, and they’re straight forward. You want to make sure that your LLC agreements are simple, and easy to run, and doesn’t put you in a situation where people can later say, “You didn’t follow your own formalities,” and therefore have liability risks.

These are very simple things, but they can be easily built into your LLC agreement and add lots of protection.

What has been your experience with LLC agreements? Did you write an LLC agreement when you setup your company? What are you thinking about when you’re setting up your LLC agreement? Let us know in the comments below.

 

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This posting is intended to be a tool to familiarize readers with some of the issues discussed herein.  This is not meant to be a comprehensive discussion and additional details should be discussed with your attorneys, accountants, consultants, bankers and other business planners who can provide advice for your circumstances.  This article should not be treated as legal advice to any person or entity. 

About the Author

Shawn McBride is the Chief Innovation Officer at McBride For Business, LLC. His signature keynote, The 3 Laws of Empowerment (www.yourbusinessspeaker.com) , gives audiences an entertaining look at how they can prepare, plan and protect themselves. You can reach R. Shawn McBride at info@mcbrideforbusiness.com or (214) 418-0258.

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